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Availability of pumping systems applicable to bulk carriers

Solas 74 as amended Chapter XII: Additional safety measures for bulk carriers Regulation 13 specifies (This regulation applies to bulk carriers regardless of their date of construction) that on bulk carriers, the means for draining and pumping ballast tanks forward of the collision bulkhead and bilges of dry spaces any part of which extends forward of the foremost cargo hold, shall be capable of being brought into operation froma readily accessible enclosed space, the location of which is accessible from the navigation bridge or propulsion machinery control position without traversing exposed freeboard or superstructure decks.



Where pipes serving such tanks or bilges pierce the collision bulkhead, valve operation by means of remotely operated actuators may be accepted, as an alternative to the valve control specified in regulation II-1/11.4, provided that the location of such valve controls complies with this regulation.

Bulk carriers constructed before 1 July 2004 shall comply with the requirements of this regulation not later than the date of the first intermediate or renewal survey of the ship to be carried out after 1 July 2004, but in no case later than 1 July 2007.


Hold, ballast and dry space water level detectors for bulk carriers

Solas 74 as amended Chapter XII: Additional safety measures for bulk carriers Regulation 12 specifies (This regulation applies to bulk carriers regardless of their date of construction) that on bulk carriers, :

Bulk carriers shall be fitted with water level detectors:
1) in each cargo hold, giving audible and visual alarms, one when the water level above the inner bottom in any hold reaches a height of 0.5mand another at a height not less than 15%of the depth of the cargo hold but not more than 2 m. On bulk carriers to which regulation 9.2 applies, detectors with only the latter alarm need be installed. The water level detectors shall be fitted in the aft end of the cargo holds. For cargo holds which are used for water ballast, an alarm overriding device may be installed. The visual alarms shall clearly discriminate between the two different water levels detected in each hold;

2) in any ballast tank forward of the collision bulkhead required by regulation II-1/11, giving an audible and visual alarm when the liquid in the tank reaches a level not exceeding 10%of the tank capacity. An alarm overriding device may be installed to be activated when the tank is in use; and

3) in any dry or void space other than a chain cable locker, any part of which extends forward of the foremost cargo hold, giving an audible and visual alarmat a water level of 0.1mabove the deck. Such alarms need not be provided in enclosed spaces the volume of which does not exceed 0.1% of the ship’s maximum displacement volume.


The audible and visual alarms specified in paragraph 1 shall be located on the navigation bridge.

Bulk carriers constructed before 1 July 2004 shall comply with the requirements of this regulation not later than the date of the annual, intermediate or renewal survey of the ship to be carried out after 1 July 2004, whichever comes first.


US Regulation On Ballast Water Management

According to revised US Regulations, the Ballast Water Management Plan (BWMP) should include procedures for fouling and sediment management.

Moreover, BWMP procedures associated with sediment removal should also be included and vessels will have to develop procedures addressing fouling management. These procedures should be incorporated in the existing BWMP, preferably as a non-mandatory appendix or annex, leaving the reviewed part of the plan unaffected. Alternatively, a separate biofouling management plan should be developed to include fouling management procedures.

Biofouling management plans and/ or procedures should be developed in accordance with the provisions of IMO Res.207 (62). In order to assist operators in achieving compliance with such legislation, LR has developed a biofouling management model plan.

Presently, there is no need to approve biofouling management plans or biofouling management procedures appended to a BWMP from either statutory or class aspects. However, at the owner's request, an advisory review service against IMO MEPC Res.207 (62) could be offered and in such case a statement of compliance will be issued accordingly.



Related guideline

  1. Ballast exchange procedure at sea


  2. Practical method for the control of transportation of harmful marine organisms


  3. Safety precautions during ballast operation


  4. Loading of high density cargo and water ballast distribution for bulk carriers


  5. Risk of partially filled ballast tanks


  6. Handling water ingress problems in bulk carrier, investigation and countermeasures



Reference publications

  1. MARPOL 73/78
  2. IMO Resolution A.774 (18) – “Guidelines for Preventing the Introduction of Unwanted Aquatic Organisms and Pathogens from Ship’s Ballast Water and Sediment Discharged”
  3. Ship’s “Procedure and Arrangements manual” (Approved by Class)
  4. Guide to Port Entry
  5. US NPDES Vessel General Permit Compliance Manual
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Top articles

  1. Loading of high density cargo and water ballast distribution for bulk carriers


  2. Risk of partially filled ballast tanks


  3. Handling water ingress problems in bulk carrier, investigation and countermeasures

  4. Survival and safety procedure for bulk carriers

  5. Suitability of Shore Terminals for handling bulk cargo


  6. Preparation for ships carrying bulk cargo & standard loading condition




Operation of sea going bulk carriers involved numerous hazards . Careful planning and exercising due caution for all critical shipboard matters are important . This site is a quick reference to international shipping community with guidance and information on the loading and discharging of modern bulk carriers so as to remain within the limitations as specified by the classification society.
It is vital to reduce the likelihood of over-stressing the ship's structure and also complying with all essential safety measures for a safe passage at sea. Our detail pages contain various bulk carrier related topics that might be useful for people working on board and those who working ashore in the terminal. For any remarks please Contact us

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